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Laura WheelerDigital Science Webinar, Community Manager at Digital Science will be hosting our third webinar, “The Evolution of Scholarly Access and Sharing”.

The webinar will be taking place on Wednesday 23rd September at 4pm BST / 11am ET. If you wish to tweet about the webinar the hashtag to use will be #DSwebinar.

Screen Shot 2015-09-02 at 14.04.36Alex Hodgson from ReadCube will be questioning and moderating the panel consisting of:

  • Fredrick Dylla, Project Lead for the STM Association’s Scholarly Collaboration Networks (SCN) Working Group, will talk about why the SCN Working Group was created, its motivations, looking at how can we optimise access in a way that doesn’t damage business models.
  • John Wilbanks, the Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks, will cover the evolution and importance of open access (OA) to scholarly research communication. He’ll touch on some stories from Sage’s work including results around shared data, provenance, and open collaborations.
  • Robert W. Boissy, Manager of Account Development and Strategic Alliances, Springer Nature will discuss his experiences as a librarian by trade, and having worked in sales/licensing and account development, he’ll talk about end user experiences with content.

fred dFrederick Dylla is Executive Director Emeritus of the American Institute of Physics (AIP), having served as Executive Director & CEO from 2007-2015. AIP is a not-for-profit organization of 10 scientific societies in the physical sciences that provides an array of information-based resources. AIP delivers scholarly journals through its subsidiary, AIP Publishing LLC, for which Dylla currently serves as senior policy advisor. Prior to coming to AIP, Dylla was Chief Technology Officer and Associate Director at DOE’s Jefferson Lab, where he spearheaded the Free Electron Laser (FEL) program. During this time, he concurrently held an Adjunct Professorship in Physics and Applied Science at the College of William and Mary. He held various positions at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, where he helped develop technology for nuclear fusion reactors, particle accelerators, and materials processing. He received his Ph.D. in physics from MIT, is a Past President and Fellow of the AVS and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. An active member in numerous local and regional technology development organizations, Dylla was also appointed by the Virginia governor to two scientific commissions; he has also served on many national advisory committees for the Department of Energy, Department of Defense, and the National Science Foundation.

Having authored of more than 200 publications, Dylla is a strong advocate for scientific journals and for improved access to scientific information through various business models. In 2009 Dylla helped organize and participated in the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable under the aegis of the US House Science and Technology Committee. The Roundtable developed consensus recommendations for the development of public access policies for scholarly data and publications; many of its recommendations were folded into the America COMPETES Act of 2010. Dylla has worked closely with colleagues in the publishing and librarian communities and in the federal government to implement public access projects that protect scientific integrity and the scholarly publishing enterprise. In 2013 Dylla helped found CHORUS, the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States, and currently serves its board. Other publishing board involvement includes the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM) Board of Directors (2008-14), and Professional and Scholarly Publishing (PSP) Division of the Association of American Publishers (AAP) Executive Council (2008-present).

Fred will talk about why the SCN Working Group was created, its motivations, looking at how can we optimise access in a way that doesn’t damage business models.

johnJohn Wilbanks is the Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks. He has spent his career working to advance open content, open data and open innovation systems. Wilbanks also serves as a senior fellow at FasterCures, and as a senior advisor for big data to the National Coordination Office. Previously, Wilbanks worked as a legislative aide to Congressman Fortney “Pete” Stark, served as the first assistant director at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, founded and led to acquisition the bioinformatics company Incellico, Inc., and was executive director of the Science Commons project at Creative Commons. In February 2013, in response to a We the People petition that was spearheaded by Wilbanks and signed by 65,000 people, the U.S. government announced a plan to open up taxpayer-funded research data and make it available for free. Wilbanks holds a B.A. in philosophy from Tulane University and also studied modern letters at the Sorbonne.

John will talk about the evolution and importance of open access (OA) to scholarly research communication. He’ll touch on some stories from Sage’s work including results around shared data, provenance, and open collaborations.

Boissy_BobRobert W. Boissy has worked in scholarly publishing for 12 years and is currently Manager of Account Development and Strategic Alliances with Springer Nature. He has previously held positions in third party licensing, agent relations and library licensing at Springer, and for 15 years prior to that held positions in training, client technical support, and data exchange services for a subscription agency. Bob has been involved in many standards groups related to licensing and serials, and has also served as President of NASIG. He holds degrees from Middlebury College, the University at Albany, and Syracuse University.

Bob will touch on his experiences as a librarian by trade, and having worked in sales/licensing and account development, he’ll talk about end user experiences with content.

Alex will then wrap up and open up to an audience Q&A. Attendees will be able to submit questions within the webinar or on Twitter via the #DSwebinar hashtag.

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